Salary employee rules


Introduction

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) covers almost all salary employees. The FLSA is a federal law that establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, record keeping, and child labor standards affecting full-time and part-time workers in the private sector and in federal, state, and local governments.

Federal and State Regulations

Regulations governing salaries of employees are set by the federal and state government. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is a federal law that sets the minimum wage, which is currently $7.25 per hour. This wage applies to all states, regardless of their own minimum wage laws. Some states have their own minimum wage laws that are higher than the federal minimum wage. In these states, employees must be paid the higher state minimum wage.

Federal Regulations


The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) and accompanying regulations are designed to ensure that foods are safe, wholesome, and honestly labeled. FDA develops these regulations in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Topics include:
-Adulterated food
-Misbranded food
-Food allergens
-Sanitary transportation of human and animal food
-Special nutritionals such as infant formula and dietary supplements
-Medical foods
-Animal feed
-Pet food

State Regulations


There is a significant amount of variation in regulations governing tattooing at the state level. Some states have very specific requirements, such as registration of tattoo artists and/or reporting requirements for infections. Other states have very few, if any, regulations. The table below provides an overview of some key state regulations.

State Regulations
Alabama Requires registration of tattoo artists
Alaska Prohibits anyone under 18 from getting a tattoo
Arizona Requires parental consent for minors seeking tattoos
Arkansas Requires parental consent for minors seeking tattoos
California Requires parental consent for minors seeking tattoos
Colorado Requires parental consent for minors seeking tattoos
Connecticut Requires parental consent for minors seeking tattoos
Delaware requires parental consent for minors seeking tattoos
Florida requires parental consent fOr minors seeking tattoos
Georgia requires parental consent for min ors seeki ng t attoos
Hawaii requires pa rental con sent f or m inors see king t attoos
Idaho no specific st atute s gove rning t attooing
Illinois requires p arental c onsent f or m inors seek ing ta ttoos
Indiana req uires p arenta l c onsent fo r m ino rs seek ing ta ttoos

Exempt and Non-Exempt Employees

The most important thing to know about exempt and non-exempt employees is the difference between the two. Exempt employees are not entitled to overtime pay, while non-exempt employees are. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes the rules for classifying employees as exempt or non-exempt.

Exempt Employees


An exempt employee is an employee who is not subject to the minimum wage or overtime pay provisions of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Exempt employees must meet certain requirements under the FLSA, including being paid a salary rather than an hourly wage and performing certain job duties. Exempt employees are sometimes called “white collar” employees.

The following job duties may make an employee exempt from the FLSA:

  • Executive: Manages a business or department; supervises two or more full-time employees; has authority to hire or fire other employees; and sets goals and objectives for the department.
  • Administrative: Performs non-manual work directly related to the management of a business or enterprise; exercises discretion and independent judgment with respect to matters of significance; and regularly exercises authority to make decisions that affect the business.
  • Professional: Performs work requiring advanced knowledge in a field of science or learning that is customarily acquired by completing a specialized course of study beyond high school. Examples include lawyers, doctors, pharmacists, teachers, and accountants.
  • Outside Sales: Makes sales or obtains orders or contracts for services away from an employer’s place of business.
    Non-Exempt Employees

    Non-exempt employees are entitled to overtime pay for any hours worked over 40 in a workweek. They are also entitled to minimum wage, as well as other protections under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

There are many different jobs that fall under the non-exempt category, but they all have one thing in common: the employees who hold them are not exempt from the FLSA’s overtime and minimum wage provisions.

Overtime

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, record keeping, and youth employment standards affecting full-time and part-time workers in the private sector and in Federal, State, and local governments.

Federal Overtime Regulations

The federal government sets minimum standards for overtime pay. These standards are part of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Under the FLSA, most employees must be paid time-and-a-half their regular pay for any hours worked over 40 in a work week.

There are some exceptions to the overtime rule. For example, executive, administrative and professional employees may be exempt from overtime if they meet certain salary and job duties requirements. In addition, some states have their own overtime laws that may provide greater protections for employees.

If you think you’ve been denied overtime pay, you can file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division.

State Overtime Regulations

Most states have their own laws governing overtime pay. Here is a summary of the overtime regulations in each state.

Alabama: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week.

Alaska: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week, or over 8 in a day.

Arizona: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week, or over 8 in a day. Some employees may be exempt from the overtime law.

Arkansas: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week, or over 8 in a day. Some employees may be exempt from the overtime law.

California: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 8 in a day or 40 in a week, whichever is greater. Some employees may be exempt from the overtime law.

Colorado: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week, or over 12 in a day. Some employees may be exempt from the overtime law.

Connecticut: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week, or over 8 in a day. Some employees may be exempt from the overtime law.

Delaware: Employees are entitled to 1.5 times their regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a week, or over 8 in a day . Some employees may be exempt from the overtime law .

  • See more at: http://www . dol . gov / whd / state_laws / ot . htm#sthash . F4sTlpOI . dpuf
    Conclusion
    In conclusion, these are the main points to keep in mind when it comes to salary employees: they are exempt from overtime pay, they must be paid a salary of at least $455 per week, and they must be paid for any workweek in which they perform any work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.