Shipping clerk job duties


Job Description

The shipping clerk job description involves a variety of activities. The most common duties include processing orders, printing labels, checking inventory, and contacting customers. Shipping clerks may also be responsible for receiving shipments, packing orders, and loading trucks. They typically work in warehouses or shipping/receiving departments.

Duties

The shipping clerk job duties vary depending on the size of the company. Typically, clerks are responsible for verifying and keeping records on incoming and outgoing shipments, preparing items for shipment, arranging transportation and warehouse storage, and coordinating with customers, suppliers, or transport companies. Clerks might also be responsible for checking inventories and updating records to reflect newly shipped or received products. Shipping clerks might also package products and load them onto trucks or conveyor belts.

Skills

shipping clerk job duties include: -Organizing shipments and preparing items for dispatch -Calculating shipping costs and preparing invoices -Checking shipments against invoices to ensure accuracy -Maintaining accurate records of shipped goods -You will need to be able to lift heavy boxes and have a valid forklift license.

Education and Training

Most shipping clerks have on-the-job training that lasts a few weeks to a few months. Some large organizations may require more formal education, such as completion of a high school diploma or equivalent, postsecondary education, or certification.

High school diploma

Most employers prefer to hire shipping and receiving clerks who have a high school diploma. Some companies may require or prefer applicants who have completed a formal training program in shipping and receiving, warehouse operations, or supply chain management. However, many shipping and receiving clerks learn their job duties through on-the-job training.

Some college

While a shipping clerk position may not require a college degree, some employers prefer applicants who have completed at least some college coursework. In some cases, shipping clerks may receive on-the-job training that lasts for several weeks or months. During training, new hires learn about the company’s products, computer systems, and shipping procedures. They also work with more experienced shipping clerks to get a better understanding of the daily tasks and responsibilities of the job.

Post-secondary training

Although a high school diploma is the minimum shipping clerk job requirement, post-secondary training, especially in business or office administration, can be an asset. Courses in computer applications, mathematics and English are also recommended.

Salary and Job Outlook

The median annual salary for shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks was $32,490 in May 2018.1 The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $21,430, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $50,360.1 Approximately 119,700 people worked as shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks in 2016.1

Salary


The median annual wage for shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks was $32,550 in May 2019. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $22,860, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $50,200.
In May 2019, the median annual wages for shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Manufacturing $35,870
Retail trade $30,770
Wholesale trade $33,950
Transportation and warehousing $33,270
Information $32,580

Job outlook

The job outlook for shipping clerks is fair. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment in this occupation will grow by about 4 percent from 2019 to 2029. This is about as fast as the average for all occupations.


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